Lost boys, found men: From civil war in Sudan to the classrooms and convocation stage at Lethbridge College

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Part IV: Conclusion

When Mathon was a child, he dreamed of being a soccer player, or maybe a lawyer in a big city. When Manyok was a child, he dreamed of one day being able to defend his village.

During the years Mathon was in the bush, “my dream was to keep fighting for my freedom and for my land.”

During the years Manyok was in the bush, “things were totally different. The question was what could you do to help the people who are dying right next to you. At the time, I was thinking ‘how can I stop this from happening?’”

For the last seven years, Manyok and Mathon have shared a common dream: education. On April 22, part of that dream will come true when they become college graduates. Their families – Mathon has three daughters and Manyok has two sons and a daughter – will be there to celebrate.

The two Lost Boys have big dreams for their children.

“I feel happy my children will have opportunities I never had,” adds Mathon. “They come home with Canadian children who are their friends. They speak English very well. My daughter corrects me!”

“My children know where I come from there was no education, that I started school when I was more than 32,” Manyok says. “But they know what it is to be a doctor (the dream of his daughter) and they know what it is to work a trade or be an engineer (the dream of Manyok’s older son.)

“They dream of education.”

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